HTC Desire 820 Review: The First 64 Bit Android Phone

HTC Desire 820 Review: The First 64 Bit Android Phone

By Rich W Woods

Ok, it wasn’t exactly the first 64 bit Android phone, but the HTC Desire 510 is lower end and didn’t quite get the publicity. The more I used the HTC Desire 820, the more impressed I became with it I became. The display is just 720p, which is a pretty low resolution on a 5.5″ LCD. It comes out to 267 ppi.

Unfortunately, it runs Android 4.4 KitKat, which doesn’t support 64 bit, so I didn’t get that 64 bit goodness that will come when it gets updated to Lollipop. Unfortunately, this phone won’t get that update. It seemed to be using some sort of in-house version of Sense, which doesn’t have the ability to receive OTA updates.

HTC Desire 820: Specs

16 GB, Expandable to 128 GB

Processor Octa Core Snapdragon 615, 1.5 GHz Quad & 1 GHz Quad
Display 5.5″, 720p, 267 ppi, LCD
Body 157.7×78.7×7.7 mm, 155 g
Camera 13 MP, 4160×3120, 8 MP Front
Video 1080p – 30 fps, Front 1080p – 30 fps
Aperture f/2.2
Focal Length 28 mm
Storage 16 GB, Expandable to 128 GB
RAM 2 GB
Battery 2600 mAh
Price ~$350

HTC Desire 820: Benchmarks

I am not a fan of benchmarks because they rarely provide any insight into real world usage of the device. Typically, they only provide ammo for trolls that have created an “Apple vs Android” war in their heads. People have requested them so I figured it couldn’t hurt to include some screenshots.

The first is a battery test from Geekbench 3, the first is with the dim screen toggled off and the second is with it on.

I also did processor benchmarks with Geekbench 3 and AnTuTu.

HTC Desire 820: Rear Camera

The HTC Desire 820 uses a 13 MP rear camera with an f/2.2 aperture. Unfortunately, it leaves out some features that the HTC One M8 has, such as Zoe. Zoe is a feature that allows the user to take a video and pick a frame from the video to use as a still image. I guess it’s easier to capture a frame on a lower resolution camera.

The camera ended up being just a bit disappointing. I liked the HTC Desire Eye because it saturated the photos like the HTC One M8 did but without the limitations that come with a 4 MP camera. The HTC Desire 820 seemed oversaturated to the point where the colors bleed just a bit.

HTC Desire 820: Front Camera

The HTC Desire 820 has a great 8 MP front camera. 8 MP leaves a lot of room to crop but it might be a bit much since selfies don’t need to be cropped as much as regular photos do. After all, the iPhone 6 does just fine with 1.2 MP.

My only problem with the HTC Desire 820 front camera is that there is a bit of glare in bright lighting. This is all too common in Android phones; however, it’s not quite as bad in this one. It’s still one of the better front facing cameras.

HTC Desire 820: Video

Unfortunately, the HTC Desire 820 only records 1080p video at 30 fps. It has the resolution for 4K, which is 8.3 MP. I prefer 1080p at 60 fps, which is a rare feature in smart phones, but it doesn’t do that either.

HTC Desire 820: Review

Unfortunately, many of the features of this device were in Chinese, even though the language was set to English. I was unable to choose any English sources in BlinkFeed. Here’s a video of my final impressions.

That’s it for the HTC Desire 820. I’m still working with the Microsoft Lumia 535 and the Amazon Fire Phone and I just received the Nokia Lumia 735, so stay tuned. Also, check out the forums. There’s not enough people there. If you happen to be on Windows 8.1 or Windows Phone 8.1, check out the For the Love of Tech app.

Related

All HTC Desire 820 Camera Comparisons

About the author
Rich Woods

Being a computer programmer wasn't enough to fulfill his love of technology. In 2013, Rich founded For the Love of Tech and has been writing about his love of tech ever since.

  • thank you for the review, I was about to get this phone in about a week , but because of this review I think I will go for One M8 instead.

    • rwoods716

      Well, I would suggest the One M9 if you have the option, even the Desire Eye. You know, this wasn’t a bad phone. It would just seem that I got some kind of bootleg unit that didn’t allow me to upgrade and such,